Architectural Salvage visits McIver Street, hauls away 5,500 pounds of doors, windows and other reusable materials

old house with two front porches, one on the first floor and one on the second

115 McIver, built in 1919, must have been a grand house back when homes lined both sides of the street and extended all the way to Walker Avenue.

UNCG soon will tear down three of the McIver Street houses that it owns. Before the wrecking crew arrives, the school allowed Architectural Salvage of Greensboro to go in and take out dozens of doors, windows, radiators and radiator covers, push-button light switches, molding, built-in bookcases and other parts of the houses that can be reused. ASG volunteers removed and hauled away some 5,500 pounds of materials that will be sold for homeowners and builders to use in renovations of other older homes.

Volunteers spent three days in the houses last week. 111 McIver was a nice little 1940 bungalow in its day. 113 McIver had so much mold and mildew inside that just walking into the place took an act of courage. 115 McIver, with its double front porches, was the grandest of the three but had long ago slipped into decay as a rental property.

The job isn’t finished yet. ASG volunteers will strip hardware, remove nails from molding and get everything cleaned up for sale.

The Architectural Salvage showroom is at 1028-B Huffman Street in East Greensboro. Hours are Fridays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturdays 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. or by appointment.

claw-foot bathtub

A claw-foot tub that was saved; photo from the ASG Instagram account: https://www.instagram.com/asgofgso/

old house with overgrown vegetation

The stone chimney and columns at 113 McIver weren’t salvageable, sadly.

 

 

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One Response to Architectural Salvage visits McIver Street, hauls away 5,500 pounds of doors, windows and other reusable materials

  1. David Arneke says:

    I should have mentioned: Preservation Greensboro tried to find buyers for the three houses. The new owners would have had to move them, of course, which is an awfully tough sell. The houses couldn’t be saved, but not from lack of trying.

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